MingHe buck/boost converters – handy, if you’re careful!

The following information seems to generalize to any of MingHe’s buck/boost converter designs with the 8x2pin daughter board with display and buttons).

Though most of this info is for the more common MingHe buck or boost converters, I happen to have the MingHe D3806 Buck+Boost converter:

MingHe D3806
MingHe D3806

 

Many reviews are out there for the B3603 and some for the BST400. They all seem to have the same basic functionality on the control board, though the calibration points will differ depending on available output ranges.

My experience with this device seems to be in line with that of other reviewers – namely, it works well with no major issues. However, there are two things to keep in mind:

I’ve noticed that light loads (e.g., 5V < 200 mA) tend to cause momentary voltage overshoots on power down (the lower the load, the more the overshoot)! even a short burst of 12V into a 3.3V or 5V circuit can kill a device, so beware. Might want to add a small (say 2W) load resistor for safety for small loads (if not in CC mode).

As others have noted, if you press and hold “Set”, you enter calibration mode (you’ll see something like “–F1–” on the display). If you didn’t mean to enter cal mode just power it off right now, then back on, to ensure you’re out of that mode! See the EEVBlog review below for how this can otherwise quickly lead to electronic sadness if you accidentally step into the higher voltage cal settings unwittingly.

Notes on the Function Menu settings (AKA the “secret” menu since it’s not exactly obvious):

Hold OK on power-up and wait for the display to cycle -0-, -1-, -2-, -0-… Release OK to toggle and then view that setting. Power down and repeat the process as necessary.

  • -0- — y=output on initial power; n=output only after pressing OK (I prefer this)
  • -1- — y=show V, A, power, and cumulative amp-hour displays; n=V, A only
  • -2- — y=cycle displays by default; n=don’t cycle by default

There seems to be a way to enter quite a few voltage/current presets – check out the manuals for details (seems like this could be prone to accidental selection like calibration is, but YMMV).

Further reading:

Postscript:

MingHe’s ZXY6005S and ZXY6010S devices are very intriguing! There are older revisions (2012) and newer ones (>= 2013-08) on eBay… I haven’t tried it yet but Julian has it in his round-up video. While I think the D3806 hits the sweet spot for power and flexibility for me, that LCD + rotary encoder is pretty sweet!

2 Comments


  1. Did you ever get this to work satisfactory, I Built one in to a bench supply and despite getting an initial very high over voltage 124 vdc! that was the only output.

    Reply

    1. If you got a faulty one and it threw 124V through the output capacitors, it’s surely broken now. I’m not saying I recommend them either – just that mine seemed to work. I’m sorry to hear you got one that failed that badly.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*